Humidifier is necessary to combat dry winter air and trim energy costs

The winter weather in my area often hangs around for eight straight months.

It’s necessary to start up the furnace in late August because of the chilly nights.

It’s not unusual to have snow on the ground at Easter or even Mother’s Day. When the weather is cold, the air is naturally dry. Spending any amount of time outside results in chapped lips and dry, itchy skin. Inside the house, with the furnace blasing non stop, the problems associated with insufficient humidity are much worse. Bloody noses, headaches, sore throat, itchy eyes, frequent coughing and sneezing are all consequences of overly dry air. A lack of moisture in the air aggravates symptoms of allergies and asthma and results in static shock. Because the air dries out nasal passages, it makes people more susceptible to illness and infection. Recovery also takes longer. Low humidity levels are potentially damaging to antiques, musical instruments and hardwood floors, causing the wood to crack and split. There’s also the issue that dry air feels colder, leading to higher thermostat settings. This puts greater strain on the furnace and increases the chance of malfunction. The perfect solution to trim energy costs and improve the health and comfort of the home is a humidifier. While portable humidifiers require a lot of maintenance and don’t make much of an impact, whole-house humidifiers are very effective. They require only annual maintenance, operate silently and can maintain proper moisture levels throughout the entire home. There are fan-style, bypass and steam-style humidifier, which all offer various benefits. It’s a good idea to consult with a licensed HVAC contractor for a recommendation and installation of a humidifier.

 

Humidifier is necessary to combat dry winter air and trim energy costs